An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

Diamond cutting has not always been possible. Due to the fact that diamonds are exceptionally hard, it took some time before it was discovered the diamonds could in fact be cut by other diamonds or by tools coated in diamond dust. From the point of that industry changing discovery, diamond cutters began experimenting with various faceting techniques.

In 1919, a diamond cutter by the name of Tolkowsy published a thesis that explored the various aspects of diamond cutting and proposed an optimal configuration to achieve maximum brilliance with any particular stone. The end result of his cutting technique was the round diamond.

The vast majority of round diamonds used in engagement rings, wedding rings and other jewellery items now make use of that exact same configuration. A brilliant round cut diamond will typically have 58 triangular or kite shaped facets which radiate outwards from a central point. The 58th facet is culet, or the bottom most facet of the diamond. Some diamonds do not have this, but instead have a pointed bottom.

An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

A round cut diamond tends to cost more per carat than a diamond of a different cut as the majority of the original, rough diamond gets cut away. This means that a round cut diamond requires a larger rough gemstone as a starting point than most other cuts. They make up for this by giving the appearance of being larger than other diamonds of the same carat.

When it comes to choosing a setting for your engagement or wedding ring, there are a number of options to choose from. Each with its own set of compliments for your chosen stone.

An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

Shown with a 0.50ct Diamond



Solitaire setting

A solitaire set stone is a very classic setting for an engagement ring. It features a single stone set on a fairly simple band, though some embellishments may be added for a more individualised look. This setting is designed to showcase the brilliance of the round cut diamond.

An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

Bezel setting

This setting differs from the solitaire in that the diamond is encircled by a band of metal rather than clasped. The surrounding metal band provides more protection for the gem stone and is a good option for those who tend to work with their hands a lot more or are concerned about losing the precious gemstone.

An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

Shown with a 1.50ct Diamond



Halo setting


The halo setting is by far a more flashy and noticeable setting for a diamond engagement ring. In this setting the chosen round cut diamond is encircled by at least one ring of smaller diamonds. The concept is to allow the smaller diamonds to recapture and further enhance the brilliance of the central stone.

An in-depth look at round cut diamonds

All three of these settings can be combined with various other configurations and settings such as the pave, channel, 3-stone, tension and cluster to create a truly magnificent engagement ring to entrance and captivate.